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Scottish genealogy: the basics and beyond.


David Dobson identifies the major sources and repositories for those just getting started on their research. But what makes this book stand out from all the rest is its focus on the other, less commonly used, sources that exist, which will allow more advanced researchers to put the basic facts they have gathered into context.

With an emphasis on publications, manuscript sources, and archival records, Dr. Dobson highlights ways to trace Scottish ancestors using alternative sources, primarily those covering the years between 1550 and 1850. For each research topic—including statutory registers, church records, tax records, sasines and land registers, court records, military and maritime sources, burgh and estate records, emigration records, and much more—Dr. Dobson has compiled an extensive list of the publications and archival records that will enable family historians to advance their research.

Blood legacy: reckoning with a family’s story of slavery.


Concentrating on the period from the eighteenth century through to 1948 when the National Health Service was founded and looking in particular at the Victorian era. Using original records, contemporary accounts, photographs, illustrations and case studies of real individuals, she brings the story of the asylums and their patients to life. There are sections on the systems in Scotland, Ireland, England and Wales

Tracing your Glasgow ancestors: a guide for family and local historians.


Tracing Your Glasgow Ancestors is a volume in the series of city ancestral guides published by Pen & Sword for readers and researchers who want to find out about life in Glasgow in the past and to know where the key sources for its history can be found. In vivid detail it describes the rise of Glasgow through tobacco, shipping, manufacturing and trade from a minor cathedral town to the cosmopolitan centre of the present day.
Ian Maxwells book focuses on the lives of the local people both rich and poor and on their experience as Glasgow developed around them. It looks at their living conditions, at health and the ravages of disease, at the influence of religion and migration and education. It is the story of the Irish and Highland migrants, Quakers, Jews, Irish, Italians, and more recently people from the Caribbean, South-Asia and China who have made Glasgow their home.
A wealth of information on the city and its people is available, and Glasgow Ancestors is an essential guide for anyone researching its history or the life of an individual ancestor. institutions, clubs, societies and schools

Tracing your ancestors in lunatic asylums: a guide for family historians.


Concentrating on the period from the eighteenth century through to 1948 when the National Health Service was founded and looking in particular at the Victorian era. Using original records, contemporary accounts, photographs, illustrations and case studies of real individuals, she brings the story of the asylums and their patients to life. There are sections on the systems in Scotland, Ireland, England and Wales

Research Centre Open Thursday and Saturday


The Society is pleased to announce that Mansfield Street Research Centre will be open on Thursdays as well as Saturdays from 2pm till 4pm until further notice. The session must be booked in advance by phoning the centre on 0141 339 8303 during opening hours. The Centre will be manned on Thursdays and Saturdays between […]